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The Westminster Conference

 

The Westminster Conference meets for two days each year, usually in December. During the conference, six papers are presented, three on each day, examining the history, doctrine and practice of people, events and churches associated with the Puritans, their forebears and successors. The perspective is that of evangelical and reformed Biblical Christianity, focusing on central gospel themes such as grace, faith, atonement and justification and the outworking of the gospel in the lives of believers.

Our last conference was in 2017. The next will be on Tuesday 4th and Wednesday 5th December 2018. Past papers are published in book form. (See our publications page).

Sovereign Grace O’er Sin Abounding

 

Tuesday 4th & Wednesday 5th December 2018

 

Tuesday 4th December

AMYRALDISM (PAUL WELLS)
Moise Amyraut (1596-1664) was born in Bourgueil, France, and became a gifted scholar. He eventually took up residence in Saumur as both professor and pastor, following in that city such men as John Cameron and Jean Daillé. Here he developed his distinctive theology, altering Calvinistic doctrine as it concerned the nature, extent and purpose of Christ’s work of atonement. Paul Wells will consider the man but concentrate on his system.

ARTHUR W. PINK (GEOFF THOMAS)
A. W. Pink has long been recognised as a key figure in the 20th century recovery of Calvinistic doctrine. But who was he? Where did he live and work? How and what did he teach? Geoff Thomas will consider Pink’s life and labours with all its distinctive aspects, his strengths and his weaknesses. We will see how the Lord God used this man in the recovery of biblical truths about salvation, and learn lessons for our own efforts in defending and advancing such truth.

THE GREAT WAR AND MODERN CHRISTIANITY (PHIL ARTHUR)
What we now call the First World War was known at the time simply as ‘the Great War.’ The conflict had a striking impact on the life of the British nation, not just militarily, socially and economically, but also spiritually. Phil Arthur will look at the spiritual impact of the Great War in its context, including trends in society prior to the war, helping us to understand what was its immediate effect in the United Kingdom and its enduring legacy.

Wednesday 5th December

READING HERMAN BAVINCK (JAMES EGLINTON)
Something of a resurgence has taken place in publishing the works of Herman Bavinck (1854-1921), especially with the relatively recent translation into English of his four-volume Gereformeerde Dogmatiek, or Refo . What are his particular qualities and distinct contributions? Ought we to be reading such a work for ourselves? What are the benefits that weshould look to obtain from engaging with one of the great Calvinist scholars of his day?

JOHN OWEN AND THE PERSON OF CHRIST (JEREMY WALKER)
In 1679, only four years before his death in 1683, John Owen published his Christologia, subtitled “A Declaration of the Glorious Mystery of the Person of Christ – God and Man.” It was a time of theological, ecclesiastical, political, and social turmoil. What possessed the mind and heart of such a prominent Christian as John Owen at this time? We will try to trace some of the features and emphases of Owen’s work on the person of Christ that will still bless us today.

“THE LIFE OF DAVD BRAINERD”: THE STORY, THE BOOK, THE IMPACT (NIGEL GRAHAM)
When Jonathan Edwards recorded the life of his friend, David Brainerd, it was intended primarily as a personal testimony to a valued brother. However, the story of Brainerd’s life has resounded across the decades, spurring multitudes to greater consecration and providing a powerful example of a life lived for the glory of God. Nigel Graham will consider the character of the man, the origins of the book, and the force of Edwards’ testimony to a godly man.